Tag Archives: teaching

To the Introvert, on the First Day of Teaching

I have been teaching in various educational settings since 1997–that’s 21 years of face-to-face classroom experience–and one thing that never ceases to amaze me is how hard it still is for me, as an introvert, to get up in front … Continue reading

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AY 2017-2018 Begins: Here Are Some Behind-the-Scenes Glimpses into the Making of an Online Course.

I’ve been radio-silent on this blog for over a month now, and that’s because I became an Auntie for the first time at the end of July (yay!!!), we got the page proofs for Melusine’s Footprint (yay!!!), and I was … Continue reading

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Teaching an online class for the first time: things to consider

I am by no means an expert in distance/online education, and I would never claim to be one. But after having taught my second online course in two different university settings this past June, I do have a couple of … Continue reading

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2016 End-of-the-Year Wrap-Up

Professors–particularly professors who are contingent (non-permanent and adjunct faculty). permanent but not tenured, and tenure-track but not tenured–are regularly asked to perform acts of self-assessment, filling out performance evaluations, maintaining an updated CV, and responding to our supervisors’ assessment of … Continue reading

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The View From My Desk: Week 11

Here is the photo I snapped of my desk on the first day of the 11th week of the Fall term: Of course, that it was taken on week eleven means that this photo was snapped on Hallowe’en, which is … Continue reading

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The View From My Desk: Week Six

Welcome back! We’ve just finished Week Six of classes, and naturally, that means that things are a bit more hectic around here than they were during Week Two. I’ve now taught 60 class sessions spread across five different courses, which … Continue reading

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They Didn’t READ! What to do with unprepared students (besides just kicking them out and canceling class)

There is nothing less fun than being in a classroom with unprepared students, but the reality is that it is going to happen. When you are prepared for this possibility, you have the means to avoid unpleasant confrontations with students, and the ability to make sure your class can still be successful in meeting the goals you have set for it. Continue reading

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So, You’re Developing Your First Solo Class: A Brief Guide To College Course Levels

If you have never taught before, or have been a teaching assistant for a course but not Instructor of Record, the idea of developing your own syllabus can be a daunting one. What should you teach? How should you teach … Continue reading

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The “Back Pocket” Lesson Plan

“Back pocket” lesson plans are perfect for days when you’re too swamped to prepare carefully for a class session; when you’ve forgotten or are unable to access some element of a prepared lesson without which you cannot proceed as planned, like a handout or reading or audio-visual component, or when the Internet is unexpectedly down in the classroom; when you simply cannot think of something interesting or meaningful to do in class; for days when the planned lesson seems to be going flat; for days when you finish early and have ten or more minutes left in the session; or really, for any occasion when you want to turn the class over a little more to the students. Continue reading

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“What’s in a name?”: Rethinking the “Essay” in the contemporary college classroom

I am going to argue here–perhaps, controversially–that the average poor performance on an essay at the college level has nothing to do with a student’s actual ability to complete such an assignment, and everything to do with the student’s misconception of what an “essay” is. While there are certainly “lazy students” who cannot be bothered to do the work, I find that the vast majority of mine are not lazy in the slightest; rather, they’re afraid of letting me down (and of getting a bad grade). Continue reading

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